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“She was described as tenacious, abrasive, dedicated, thorough, strong-willed, and determined. She was ethnocentric and controversial and met opposition at some pueblos. None-the-less, her work was an important contribution to anthropology as well as history.”
Matilda Coxe Stevenson
1849–1915
County : Cibola
Category : Science/Religion
Matilda Coxe Stevenson
Matilda Coxe Stevenson
Matilda Coxe Stevenson
1849–1915
County : Cibola
Category : Science/Religion

Matilda Coxe Stevenson was a daughter of Alexander Hamilton Evans and Maria Coxe Evans. Matilda chose to keep her mother’s maiden name and after her 1872 marriage to James Stevenson, added her husband’s name. She first came to New Mexico with her husband—who was sent by the Smithsonian Institution’s Bureau of Ethnology to research at Zuni Pueblo. Matilda devoted her life to the study of the Native Americans of New Mexico. She started by assisting her husband and preparing catalogues of artifacts collected in the early expeditions to New Mexico. In 1879, she studied at Zuni Pueblo for six months and visited most of the other pueblos as well as Canyon de Chelly and Rito de los Frijoles (Bandelier National Park). She initially shared her husband’s work and interest, but by 1881, she began to research on her own and write her own papers.

 

Matilda focused on Zuni women and children, and then investigated among the Navajo people and at Zia Pueblo. As a woman, she had access to information unavailable to male ethnologists. So her work broke boundaries unavailable to her male colleagues.

 

In the meantime, she contacted and corresponded with women interested in the development of the “science of anthropology.” They organized a meeting in 1885 and formed The Women’s Anthropological Society of America. Matilda Coxe Stevenson was named the organization’s first President.

 

Her husband died in 1888 and, in essence, she was invited to take his place on the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology of the Smithsonian Institution in 1890. She returned to New Mexico, determined to capture as much of American Indian Life as possible before it disappeared. She also wanted to finish her husband’s work.

 

She studied and recorded the religious symbolism embodied in the Zuni’s ceramic art, photographed ceremonials at various pueblos, advocated the comparative study of the pueblos, and published reports still used by scholars of the Southwest. The Zuni people, themselves, refer to her work.

 

She was described as tenacious, abrasive, dedicated, thorough, strong-willed, and determined. She was ethnocentric and controversial and met opposition at some pueblos. None-the-less, her work was an important contribution to anthropology as well as history. While she was the first woman employed as an anthropologist anywhere, she was also a pioneer in her field and her work has withstood the test of time.

Sources:

Cheryle J. Foote, Women of the New Mexico Frontier, 1846-1912, (Albuquerque; University of New Mexico Press, 2005)

Don D. Fowler, A Laboratory for Anthropology: Science and Romanticism in the American Southwest, 1846-1930, (Albuquerque; University of New Mexico Press, 2000)

Women’s Anthropological Society of America, Organization and Historical Sketch of the Women’s Anthropological Society of America, (Washington, DC; Published by the Society, 1889)